31 March 2018

2018 Fischer Random Cup PGN

The 'Blog Archive' on the right shows that my normal schedule is two posts per month, usually on the third and fourth Saturday of the month. Since this month has five Saturdays, I used the extra day to collect games from the recent Fischer Random Cup in Reykjavik.

For an overview of data about the event available from Chess-results.com, see the first post from this month, Lenderman, Rapport Take Reykjavik. For an overview of data available from Chessbomb.com, see More on the Fischer Random Cup. In that post I wrote,

How about some games? Since 100 players participated, 50 games were played per round -- nine rounds should give 450 games for the tournament. The page Fischer Random Cup (reykjavikopen.com) has results for 20 games per round, presumably for games which were recorded automatically while they were in progress. [...] A similar interface producing the same information is on GAMMA Reykjavík Fischer Random Chess Memorial 2018 (chessbomb.com).

I used Chess-results.com to identify the top five boards per round, then used Chessbomb.com to create a PGN file of those games. That makes 45 games from the event (in fact, 46 games, because one game from round one defaulted after the first move). The following table shows the start position used in each round. The start position for round five was not recorded correctly at Chessbomb.com, so those games are effectively missing.

Rd Start Position (SP)
01 SP342 NRBKQBRN
02 SP592 BBRQNKRN
03 SP570 RNKNBBRQ
04 SP276 NBBRKNRQ
05 SP???
06 SP244 NBBRKQNR
07 SP095 NNRKRQBB
08 SP752 BBRKNNRQ
09 SP013 QNNBRKBR

The PGN file can be found at m-w.com/c960/blog/c96-ic31.pgn. If you find a problem with the file, please flag it using the comment section for this post.

24 March 2018

More on the Fischer Random Cup

After last week's post Lenderman, Rapport Take Reykjavík, what more can be said about the event, aka the 'European Fischer Random Cup'. How about some games? Since 100 players participated, 50 games were played per round -- nine rounds should give 450 games for the tournament.

The page Fischer Random Cup (reykjavikopen.com) has results for 20 games per round, presumably for games which were recorded automatically while they were in progress. Clicking on a game opens a viewer to play through and download the game. Clicking on the PGN download button gives only the message 'Not logged in'. Logging in to Chessbomb.com gives the message 'Only Premium accounts can download PGN'. A similar interface producing the same information is on GAMMA Reykjavík Fischer Random Chess Memorial 2018 (chessbomb.com).

Back to Reykjavikopen.com, a number of side events were held in conjunction with the Fischer Random Cup (GAMMA Reykjavík Open 2018 – Bobby Fischer Memorial):-

The page announcing the Fischer Memorial Tour I, 'a trip to the Fischer Center in Selfoss and Fischer’s Grave nearby', included a map of Selfoss:-

For more about the Fischer Center, see Welcome to the Bobby Fischer Center (fischersetur.is).

17 March 2018

Lenderman, Rapport Take Reykjavik

Ever since posting about the special Fischer Random Chess960 event as part of the 2018 Fischer Memorial (December 2017), I've been counting down the days, eagerly awaiting the results. The following table shows the top-20 of the 100 players who participated.


Reykjavik Fischer Random 2018 - European Fischer Random Cup
(chess-results.com)

An undated report from the official site, Lenderman wins the Bobby Fischer Cup - Rapport European Champion (reykjavikopen.com; 'GAMMA Reykjavik Open 2018 - Bobby Fischer Memorial'), started,

The first official European Championship in Fischer Random was played on the 9th of March, on Bobby Fischer’s [75th] birthday ... fittingly! The tournament was held by the GAMMA Reykjavik Open organisers in co-ordination with the ECU and with great support from Susan Polgar. The atmosphere in the playing hall was tremendous and many players claimed it was the most fun they had in a while playing chess! Before every round the starting position was randomly drawn so before the game instead of being relaxed you usually saw the players already pondering the starting position and possible plans.

I'll have more about the event in my next post.

24 February 2018

2018 Carlsen - Nakamura : Resources

In my previous post, 2018 Carlsen - Nakamura, I wrote,
The match generated considerable interest about 'Fischer Random Chess960' (as someone called it during the match and which is a good compromise to avoid the confusion surrounding the two names) and I'll have more to say about that in a follow-up post.

For consistent, top-level reporting on the match, you can't beat the resources shown in the following table. The first column leads to a record of the live commentary. The other two columns are for leading chess news sources that put considerable effort into covering the match. All three resources also allowed comments, which are an important part of the record.

Twitch
(Video)
Chess.com
(Peter Doggers)
Chessbase
(Macauley Peterson)
Pre-match 2018-02-06:
Chess.com To Cover Carlsen - Nakamura Match
2018-02-09:
Carlsen, Nakamura in high-stakes C960 match
2018-02-09:
Day 1
Part 1
Part 2
Nakamura - Carlsen FRC Tied After Day 1 C960: Nakamura and Carlsen start with two draws
2018-02-10:
Day 2
Part 1
Part 2
FRC Day 2: Nakamura Blunders Queen C960: Carlsen grabs a point from Nakamura
2018-02-11:
Day 3
'Black Sunday' Delivers Exciting FRC C960: Two wins on day three
2018-02-12:
Day 4
Carlsen Wins, Then Flags vs Nakamura In FRC Day 4 C960: Nakamura flags Carlsen to keep match close

2018-02-13:
Final Day
Carlsen Wins FRC Championship Carlsen adds a new title: C960 champion
Post-match C960 revisited: Grandmaster analysis

I collected dozens of other references -- many well informed, some not-so-well -- but I'll leave those for another day. The table in this post gives me more than enough material to fill my chess960 time.

17 February 2018

2018 Carlsen - Nakamura

In what was billed as 'The Unofficial World Championship in Fischer Random Chess', the official World Chess Champion, GM Magnus Carlsen, beat the unofficial World Rapid Chess960 Champion, GM Hikaru Nakamura (*). Details about the match can be found on the official site Fischer Random Chess (frchess.com). GM Carlsen won the first set of eight 'slow rapid chess' games with
+3-2=3 >> 9.0-7.0 (2 points per game);

then reached the required score of 12.5 in the 'fast rapid chess' games with

+2-0=3 >> 3.5-1.5 (1 point per game);

then finished the 'fast rapid' portion of the match with

+1-1=1 >> 1.5-1.5;

to achieve an overall score of 14.0-10.0. A summary of the match regulations can be found in my previous post, A World Class Match and Some Top-level Games (January 2018).

The match generated considerable interest about 'Fischer Random Chess960' (as someone called it during the match and which is a good compromise to avoid the confusion surrounding the two names) and I'll have more to say about that in a follow-up post. In the meantime, here is a copy of the PGN game scores for the match, and here are some statistics from this blog.

The top half of the chart, 'Views', shows page views per day over the period mid-January to mid-February 2018, where a typical day is mid-two-digits. The bottom half, 'Audience' shows the origins of the visitors; (let's have a round of applause for Brazil and France!). On my main blog, I wrote a post about the atypical setting for the match: Bobby Speaks from the Grave.

***

(*) See No Place for Chess960 (February 2011), for an overview of 'Chess960 Classic Mainz' and its various World Championships, where GM Nakamura was the last winner of the main event.

27 January 2018

A World Class Match and Some Top-level Games

Before continuing the previous post, Two Important Chess.com Events, let's go back to Three Chess960 Developments to Watch (October 2017), where I noted,
In February 2018, there may be an unusual exhibition match held between Magnus Carlsen and Hikaru Nakamura, playing chess960 (also known as Fischer Random).

The web site for the match can be found at Fischer Random Chess – The Unofficial World Championship in Fischer Random Chess (frchess.com), where the Regulations page says,

The match will be played in Henie Onstad kunstsenter, at Høvikodden outside Oslo in Norway, from February 9 to February 13 2018. The match will include a total of 16 games. The first eight games are played like slow rapid chess with 45 minutes for the first 40 moves and then 15 minutes for the rest of the game, no increment. The last eight games are played as fast rapid chess with 10 minutes and 5 seconds incremental for each move. All 16 games will be played even if the match is decided. Games will not be rated.
Start positions will be chosen just before a pair of games, for example:-

For the slow rapid games, set up of the pieces will be decided by a drawing made by computer with both players present 15 minutes before the start of the game. This set up then will be used for both games of that evening.

I've already noted Friday, 9 February, 5 PM CET (aka 1700 Central European Time) in my calendar, because live streaming is promised.

***

Back to 'Two Chess.com Events', I located the games for the 'Speed Chess Championship' using the technique documented in GM Blitz Battle PGN (March 2017), and created a PGN file that is available here:-

Speed Chess Championship PGN : 45 games (15 matches with three chess960 games per match)

I had a number of unexpected problems to create and upload the file, but hope that it is usable. The PGN header tags are not the same as they were for the March 2017 upload and I'm not sure whether the Chess.com format changed or my manipulations created differences.

As for the Chess.com 'Chess960 Championship', a preliminary analysis counted 372 games in the PGN file provided by Chess.com. I wanted to look at the file in more depth, but ran out of time.

***

Looking again at the upcoming Carlsen - Nakamura 'Unofficial World Championship', the two players met in the final match for both the 2016 GM Blitz Battle and the 2017 Speed Chess Championship. Although Carlsen won both matches, Nakamura won the chess960 minimatches with identical scores: +2-0=1. Nakamura appears to be the stronger player at chess960.

20 January 2018

Two Important Chess.com Events

At the end of 2017, chess960 fans were in a holding pattern, waiting for a couple of Chess.com events to terminate:-
  • 2017-10-17: Three Chess960 Developments to Watch • Chess.com's 2017 Speed Chess Championship ('One chess960 game will be played in each time control at the end of each time period')
  • 2017-12-23: 2018 Fischer Memorial • 1st Chess.com Chess960 Championship ('you can win a ticket to the Bobby Fischer Memorial in March in Reykjavik')

Both events finished within a few days of each other. Here are Chess.com's final reports:-

Congratulations to both GM Carlsen and GM Maxime Vachier-Lagrave. Now that the events are over, where can we find the games?

Last year, when I discussed the precursor of the 'Speed Chess Championship' in GM Blitz Battle PGN (March 2017), I noted, 'To search on games, you need to know the players' names on Chess.com.' The full results of the event, including all preliminary matches, are detailed in 2017 Speed Chess Championship Schedule, Results, Information (chess.com), from which I copied the following chart.

The results of the each match include links to a full report. Here is a summary of the first round matches.

Nakamura 20.5 (Hikaru), Grigoriants 7.5 (sergiochess83)
Karjakin 19.0 (SergeyKarjakin), Meier 7.0 (GeorgMeier)
So 15.5 (gmwesley_so), Giri 14.5 (AnishGiri)
Grischuk 17.5 (Grischuk), Rapport 9.5 (Lordillidan)
Nepomniachtchi 15 (lachesisQ), Aronian 13 (LevonAronian)
Caruana 19 (FabianoCaruana), Hou 8 (yifan0227)
MVL 19 (LyonBeast), Xiong 12 (jefferyx)
Carlsen 20.5 (MagnusCarlsen), Guseinov 5.5 (GGuseinov)

In my next post, I'll try to gather all of the chess960 games from those matches. As for the chess960 championship, the 'MVL Wins' report provides the possibility to 'Download Tournament PGN'. In the next post, I'll also look at that file.